Making web pages

Here’s an example of the Markdown for a simple page:

# British Breakfasts

This is a page about breakfast.

Common choices for a tasty breakfast:

- *English:* Bacon (chunky), eggs (fried), beans...
- *Scottish:* Lorne sausage, potato scones, haggis...

## English breakfasts

The traditional English breakfast (or "fry up")...

Let’s break this example down a bit:

  • Every web page should have a main heading. In Markdown you can create the heading tag by starting the line with a # character (equivalent to an h1 tag in HTML).
  • The heading is followed by two paragraphs and a bulleted list.
  • Finally there’s a second level heading (equivalent to an h2 tag) and another paragraph.

See the markdown cheat sheet for a more in depth look at how you can format your text.

Choosing a URL

The page’s URL will be created from the name of the file; if you save the page to a file called apple-pie.mdown inside the content/pages/pudding/ directory, it will be served from http://mysite.com/pudding/apple-pie.

If your page needs more than one word in the URL we recommend that you separate those words with hyphens. Some people prefer underscores, but hyphens have two clear advantages:

  1. Underscores can be confused with spaces when viewed in underlined hyperlinks.
  2. Underscores may lose some of the SEO benefit of user friendly URLs; search engines often see a hyphen as a word separator and an underscore as part of the word. I’m fairly sure that there’s not a lot of demand on the net for “apple_pie”.